Robert Cribbin

 Emergency Management Coordinator

Tel: 599-8300

 

William J. Hendrick

Mayor

Hurricane Preparedness Flyer (PDF)

What is a Hurricane?
A hurricane is a type of tropical cyclone, which is a generic term for a low pressure system that generally forms in the tropics. The cyclone is accompanied by thunderstorms and, in the Northern Hemisphere, a counterclockwise circulation of winds near the earth's surface. Tropical cyclones are classified as follows:

* Sustained winds
A 1-minute average wind measured at about 33 ft (10 meters) above the surface.

** 1 knot = 1 nautical mile per hour or 1.15 statute miles per hour. Abbreviated as "kt".

Tropical Depression
An organized system of clouds and thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds* of 38 mph (33 kt**) or less

Tropical Storm
An organized system of strong thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 39-73 mph (34-63 kt)

Hurricane
An intense tropical weather system of strong thunderstorms with a well-defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 kt) or higher


Hurricanes are categorized according to the strength of their winds using the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale. A Category 1 storm has the lowest wind speeds, while a Category 5 hurricane has the strongest. These are relative terms, because lower category storms can sometimes inflict greater damage than higher category storms, depending on where they strike and the particular hazards they bring. In fact, tropical storms can also produce significant damage and loss of life, mainly due to flooding.

 

Hurricane Names
When the the winds from these storms reach 39 mph (34 kts), the cyclones are given names. Years ago, an international committee developed names for Atlantic cyclones (The History of Naming Hurricanes). In 1979 a six year rotating list of Atlantic storm names was adopted — alternating between male and female hurricane names. Storm names are used to facilitate geographic referencing, for warning services, for legal issues, and to reduce confusion when two or more tropical cyclones occur at the same time. Through a vote of the World Meteorological Organization Region IV Subcommittee, Atlantic cyclone names are retired usually when hurricanes result in substantial damage or death or for other special circumstances. The names assigned for the next several seasons are shown below.

 

WATCH vs. WARNING - KNOW THE DIFFERENCE

  • A HURRICANE WATCH issued for your part of the coast indicates the possibility that you could experience hurricane conditions within 36 hours.
    This watch should trigger your family's disaster plan, and protective measures should be initiated, especially those actions that require extra time such as securing a boat, leaving a barrier island, etc.

  • A HURRICANE WARNING issued for your part of the coast indicates that sustained winds of at least 74 mph are expected within 24 hours or less.
    Once this warning has been issued, your family should be in the process of completing protective actions and deciding the safest location to be during the storm.

Names for Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones

Atlantic Names – Pronunciation Guide (PDF)

 

2016

2017

Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
Ian
Julia
Karl
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tobias
Virginie
Walter

Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Don
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irma
Jose
Katia
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rina
Sean
Tammy
Vince
Whitney

 

Tornado Facts

  • When associated with hurricanes, tornadoes are not usually accompanied by hail or a lot of lightning, clues that citizens in other parts of the country watch for.

  • Tornado production can occur for days after landfall when the tropical cyclone remnants maintain an identifiable low pressure circulation.

  • They can also develop at any time of the day or night during landfall. However, by 12 hours after landfall, tornadoes tend to occur mainly during daytime hours. 

Fujita scale


The original Fujita scale (F-scale) was replaced with the
Enhanced Fujita scale on February 1, 2007. The Enhanced F-scale still is a set of wind estimates (not measurements) based on damage. It uses three-second gusts estimated at the point of damage based on a judgment of 8 levels of damage to 28 indicators. These estimates vary with height and exposure. Important note: The 3 second gust is not the same wind as in standard surface observations. Standard measurements are taken by weather stations in open exposures, using a directly measured, "one minute mile" speed. The scale uses actual damage to determine a tornado’s wind speed.

 

Family Planning

 

check markDiscuss the type of hazards that could affect your family. Know your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind.

check markLocate a safe room or the safest areas in your home for each hurricane hazard. In certain circumstances the safest areas may not be your home but within your community.

check markDetermine escape routes from your home and places to meet. These should be measured in tens of miles rather than hundreds of miles.

check markHave an out-of-state friend as a family contact, so all your family members have a single point of contact.

check markMake a plan now for what to do with your pets if you need to evacuate.

check markPost emergency telephone numbers by your phones and make sure your children know how and when to call 911.

check markCheck your insurance coverage - flood damage is not usually covered by homeowners insurance.

check markStock non-perishable emergency supplies and a Disaster Supply Kit.

check markUse a NOAA weather radio. Remember to replace its battery every 6 months, as you do with your smoke detectors.

check markTake First Aid, CPR and disaster preparedness classes.

 

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Develop a family hurricane preparedness plan before an actual storm threatens your area. "font-size: 9pt; font-family: Arial"> If your family hurricane preparedness plan includes evacuation to a safer location for any of the reasons specified with in this web site, then it is important to consider the following points:

 

If ordered to evacuate, do not wait or delay your departure.
If possible, leave before local officials issue an evacuation order for your area. Even a slight delay in starting your evacuation will result in significantly longer travel times as traffic congestion worsens.

Select an evacuation destination that is nearest to your home, preferably in the same county, or at least minimize the distance over which you must travel in order to reach your intended shelter location.
In choosing your destination, keep in mind that the hotels and other sheltering options in most inland metropolitan areas are likely to be filled very quickly in a large, multi-county hurricane evacuation event.

If you decide to evacuate to another county or region, be prepared to wait in traffic.
The large number of people in this state who must evacuate during a hurricane will probably cause massive delays and major congestion along most designated evacuation routes; the larger the storm, the greater the probability of traffic jams and extended travel times.

If possible, make arrangements to stay with the friend or relative who resides closest to your home and who will not have to evacuate. Discuss with your intended host the details of your family evacuation plan well before the beginning of the hurricane season.

If a hotel or motel is your final intended destination during an evacuation, make reservations before you leave.
Most hotel and motels will fill quickly once evacuations begin. The longer you wait to make reservations, even if an official evacuation order has not been issued for your area or county, the less likely you are to find hotel/motel room vacancies, especially along interstate highways and in major metropolitan areas.

If you are unable to stay with friends or family and no hotels/motels rooms are available, then as a last resort go to a shelter.  
Remember, shelters are not designed for comfort and do not usually accept pets.  Bring your disaster supply kit with you to the shelter. Find Pet-Friendly hotels and motels.

Make sure that you fill up your car with gas, before you leave.

 

RETROFITTING YOUR HOME


The most important precaution you can take to reduce damage to your home and property is to protect the areas where wind can enter. According to recent wind technology research, it's important to strengthen the exterior of your house so wind and debris do not tear large openings in it. You can do this by protecting and reinforcing these five critical areas:

 

Roof retrofitting

Gabled Roofsgn="justify" style="margin-top: 0; margin-bottom: 3px; margin-left:25px">
Does your home have a gabled roof? If so, the end wall of your home takes a tremendous beating during a hurricane. If not properly braced, it can collapse, causing significant damage. However, gable end walls are easy to strengthen and deserve to be a high priority on your retrofit list.

Typically, gable end trusses are directly attached to the top of gable end walls. The bottom of the truss must be securely nailed to the top of the wall and braced to adjacent trusses. This prevents wind from pushing or pulling the gable end at its critical point, where the gable truss is connected along the gable wall. Without adequate bracing, the end wall may be destroyed during hurricane winds.

To secure your gable end wall, fasten eight-foot long braces to the bottom chord of the gable truss and the adjacent trusses with sixteen-penny (16d) nails. The braces should be perpendicular to the truss, spaced at a maximum of four feet on center. In addition, be sure to tie back the gable truss with at least one eight-foot long brace, along the ridge of the roof, to several of the interior trusses.

 

Shingles
Shingles are usually not designed to resist hurricane force winds. They come with integral locking tabs or factory-applied adhesives that on occasion do not adhere properly to the underlying shingle because of cold weather installation, uneven surfaces or any number of other reasons. For increased wind resistance, have a qualified person inspect several shingle tabs to see if the adhesive has engaged. If not, use a quick-setting asphalt cement to bond them together.

To cement the shingle tabs to the underlying shingles, place two spots of quick-setting asphalt cement about the size of a quarter under each tab with a putty knife or caulking gun. Press the tab into the adhesive. Be sure to cement all the tabs throughout the roof, being careful not to bend them farther than necessary when applying the adhesive. Replace any damaged shingles immediately.

Attach Roof Sheathing with Adhesive

You can also improve the uplift resistance of the roof deck from the attic -- without removing the roof covering. This is how:

  • Using a caulking gun, apply a 1/4 inch bead of wood adhesive along the intersection of the roof deck and the roof support element (rafter or truss chord) on both sides.

  • At places where you have limited access, such as where the roof meets exterior walls, use quarter round pieces of wood approximately two to three feet long and apply the adhesive along the two adjacent sides of the block. The length of the quarter round pieces can be longer or shorter to suit your installation needs.

  • Press the wood pieces in the intersection making sure the adhesive has made solid contact with the sheathing and roof support elements.

According to static pAccording to static pressure tests, using the wood adhesive can increase the wind uplift resistance of the plywood roof sheathing by as much as three times the conventional method of securing the sheathing with nails. It should be available at your local hardware and building supply stores. Please ask your local hardware expert if other products are available that could provide the same strength and properties as a wood adhesive.

 

Hurricane Straps

Roof to Top of Wall Connection


Hurricane StrapMetal hurricane straps or clips provide the proper measure of strength and safety for the roof-to-wall connection. The common practice of toenailing the trusses or rafters often is not sufficient to hold a roof in place in high winds. These clips or straps are usually very difficult to see from the attic because of insulation.

Areas where the roof framing meets the top of stud walls are normally covered by dry wall on the inside and by wall cladding and soffit board on the outside. To install nd clips, remove the roof sheathing around the perimeter of the roof to reveal the top of the wall. You may also need to remove the soffit and exterior cladding to reveal the top 12 to 18 inches of the wall. In addition, if the exterior cladding is brick veneer, you may need to remove small sections of brick as needed.

If your roof has trusses, make sure you tie them to the wall by either anchoring to the top plate and then the top plate to the wall stud, or strapping the truss directly to the wall stud.

 

Shutters

One way to protect a home from damage in wind storms is to install shutters over all large windows and glass doors. Not only do they protect doors and windows from wind-borne objects, but they can reduce damage caused by sudden pressure changes when a window or door is broken. Laminated window systems (plastic bonded to glass) are another option, and are a particularly good choice for either building a new home or adding to an old one.

The easiest designs are those that simply cover the opening with a structural panel such as plywood. In past hurricanes, many homeowners upon returning have noticed their temporary plywood shutters blown off because they were not adequately fastened. If you have a wood-frame house, use adequate fasteners to attach the panels over the openings when a hurricane approaches. Have these temporary shutters stored and ready to use since building supply stores generally sell out of these materials quickly during a hurricane warning. If your home is made with concrete blocks, however, you will have to install anchoring devices well in advance.

The American Plywood Association (APA) - The Engineered Wood Association offers a series of Hurricane Shutter Designs. Each design is available for $1, or you can download all five designs from the APA's Web site at no cost.

Manufactured Shutters

If your residence has permanent shutters, evaluate their effectiveness. Manufacturers are responsible for testing their shutters up to the standards necessary to resist wind forces and wind-borne debris. Some shutters are very flexible, especially those that roll up.

If struck by a rigid piece of debris, shutters may bend and break the window. To determine whether your shutter can resist this impact, gently lean against it and see if it yields. You can also inspect your shutters to see if they are properly attached to the house and will not fly off during a storm by inspecting the shutter connectors for obvious excessive wear or missing connectors. Ask the shutter manufacturer for proper installation criteria.

Impact-Resistant Windows

Another way to protectAnother way to protect your home from damage in windstorms is through the installation of impact-resistant windows and doors. Although these products look no different than standard windows and doors, they offer significantly more protection from wind-borne debris. In fact, these systems are capable of resisting impacts from large objects. For this reason, temporary shutters do not need to be installed before a storm strikes. In general, the frame and glazing work together to protect your home from both the elements and the significant internal pressure changes which lead to structural damage. While large wind-borne debris may crack the impact resistant glass during the course of the storm, the window is designed to retain its integrity and not break apart. Should either the frame or glass be damaged, it can be repaired at your convenience after the storm has passed.

Securing Entry Doors

Hurricane-proof Close-upYour home has either double or single entry doors. If they are solid wood or hollow metal they probably can resist wind pressures and hurricane debris. However, if you are not sure whether they are strong enough, take these precautions:

  • Install head and foot bolts on the inactive door of double-entry doors. /font>

  • Make sure your doors have at least three hinges and a dead bolt security lock which has a minimum one inch bolt throw length.

  • Since double entry doors fail when their surface bolts break at the header trim or threshold, check the connections at both places. Be sure the surface bolt extends into the door header and through the threshold into the subfloor.

 

Bracing your garage door

Garage Doors Close-upBecause of their width, double-wide garage doors are more susceptible to wind damage than single doors. Unless you have a tested hurricane-resistant door, the wind may force it out of the roller track -- especially if the track is light weight or some of the anchor bolts are not in place. This occurs because the door deflects too much under excessive wind pressure and fails.tyle="margin-top: 0; margin-bottom: 3px"> To secure your garage door:

  • Check with your local government building official to see if there are code requirements for garage doors in your area.

  • Check with your local building supplier or garage door retailer to see if a retrofit kit is available for your garage door.

You should probably reinforce your double-wide garage door at its weakest points. This involves installing horizontal and/or vertical bracing onto each panel, using wood or light gauge metal girds bolted to the door mullions. You may also need heavier hinges and stronger end and vertical supports for your door.

 

If you decide to retrofit your garage door with a kit that allows you to operate the door after it is installed, make sure the door is balanced by lowering it about halfway and letting go. If the door goes up or down, the springs will need adjusting. Note: Since the springs are dangerous, only a professional should adjust them.

If you are unable to retrofit your garage door with a kit specifically designed for your door, you can purchase garage door retrofit kits to withstand hurricane winds at your local building supply store. Also, check to see if the supplier can do the installation.

A great time to start securing - or retrofitting - your house is when you are making other improvements or adding an addition.  

Remember: building codes reflect the lessons experts have learned from past catastrophes. Contact the local building code official to find out what requirements are necessary for your home improvement projects.

FLOOD INSURANCE


The National Flood Insurance Program, is a pre-disaster flood mitigation and insurance protection program designed to reduce the escalating cost of disasters. The National Flood Insurance Program makes federally backed flood insurance available to residents and business owners Flood damage is not usually covered by homeowners insurance.  Do not make assumptions.  Check your policy.

 

National Flood Insurance Program call
1-888-CALL-FLOOD ext. 445, TDD# 1-800-427-5593

PET PLAN

 Contact your veterinarian or local humane society for information on preparing your pets for an emergency.

BEFORE THE DISASTERl type="disc" style="margin-bottom: 0in">

  • Make sure that your pets are current on their vaccinations.  Pet shelters may require proof of vaccines.
  • Have a current photograph
  • Keep a collar with identification on your pet and have a leash on hand to control your pet.
  • Have a properly-sized pet carrier for each animal - carriers should be large enough for the animal to stand  and turn around.
  • Plan your evacuation strategy and don't forget your pet!  Specialized pet shelters, animal control shelters, veterinary clinics and friends and relatives out of harm's way are ALL potential refuges for your pet during a disaster.
  • If you plan to shelter your pet - work it into your evacuation route planning.

    DURING THE DISASTER

    • Animals brought to a pet shelter are required to have:  Proper identification collar and rabies tag, proper identification on all belongings, a carrier or cage, a leash, an ample supply of food, water and food bowls, any necessary medications, specific care instructions and news papers or trash bags for clean-up.
    • Bring pets indoor well in advance of a storm - reassure them and remain calm.
    • Pet shelters will be filled on first come, first served basis.  Call ahead and determine availability.

     AFTER THE DISASTER

    • Walk pets on a leash until they become re-oriented to their home - often familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and pets could easily be confused and become lost.  Also, downed power lines, reptiles brought in with high water and debris can all pose a threat for animals after a disaster.
    • If pets cannot be found after a disaster, contact the local animal control office to find out where lost animals can be recovered.  Bring along a picture of your pet if possible.
    • After a disaster animals can become aggressive or defensive - monitor their behavior.

    Don't forget your pet when preparing a family disaster plan.

    PET DISASTER SUPPLY KIT

    • Proper identification including immunization records
    • Ample supply of food and water
    • A carrier or cage
    • Medications
    • Muzzle, collar and leash

     ADDITIONAL LINKS

    • The HUMANE SOCIETY Disaster Center
    FEMA - Animals and Emergencies
    • Locate
    PET-FRIENDLY
    Hotels & Motels

    Disaster Supply Kit

    • Water - at least 1 gallon daily per person for 3 to 7 days

    • Food - at least enough for 3 to 7 days

    •  non-perishable packaged or canned food / juices

    •  foods for infants or the elderly

    • snack foods

    • non-electric can opener

    • cooking tools / fuel

    •  paper plates / plastic utensils

    • Blankets / Pillows, etc.

    • Clothing - seasonal / rain gear/ sturdy shoes

    • First Aid Kit / Medicines / Prescription Drugs

    • Special Items - for babies and the elderly

    • Toiletries / Hygiene items / Moisture wipes

    • Flashlight / Batteries

    • Radio - Battery operated and NOAA weather radio

    • Telephones - Fully charged cell phone with extra battery and a traditional (not cordless) telephone set

    • Cash (with some small bills) and Credit Cards - Banks and ATMs may not be available for extended periods

    • Keys

    • Toys, Books and Games

    • Important documents - in a waterproof container or watertight resealable plastic bag

    •  insurance, medical records, bank account numbers, Social Security card, etc.

    • Tools - keep a set with you during the storm

    • Vehicle fuel tanks filled

    • Pet care items

    • proper identification / immunization records / medications

    • ample supply of food and water

    • a carrier or cage

    •  muzzle and leash

    • Reminder please use battery operated Lanterns and/or flashlights when possible

    Red Cross Nassau County Chapter

     

    Address: 
    American Red Cross
    Nassau County Chapter
    195 Willis Avenue
    Mineola, NY 11501

     

    E-mail: nassau@usa.redcross.org

    Phone: 516-747-3500

    Fax: 516-747-4029

    Web site: http://www.nassauredcross.org

     



     

    New York State National Weather Service (NWS) Offices:

    Severe Weather
  • National Hurricane Center
  • NWS - Watches or Warnings for NY State
  • NWS - Hazardous Weather Outlook
  • Storm Prediction Center (SPC) Daily Storm Reports
  • SPC Convective Outlook
  • Real-time Lightning Map
  • Marine Forecasts

    Flash Flood Guidance

    Miscellaneous

    The National Weather Service Storm Spotter Network

    SKYWARN is a nationwide network of volunteer weather spotters who are trained by and report to the National Weather Service (NWS). Spotters are asked to report any occurrence of significant or severe weather to their SKYWARN Emergency Coordinator, SKYWARN Net Controller or directly to their local National Weather Service office. Spotters report many forms of significant or severe weather such as Severe Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Hail, Freezing Rain, Heavy Snow and Flooding. Because these reports contain actual readings of what is being detected by radar and satellite, they are of tremendous assistance in assessing the status of the current storm as well as post-storm damage.

    SKYWARN dates to 1965, when the NWS survey team formed to investigate the April 1965 Palm Sunday tornado outbreak found a lack of coordinated severe storm spotting networks. While many SKYWARN spotters are amateur radio operators, anyone can become a SKYWARN spotter. Joining is easy, and you will find that providing valuable weather information is both an educational and rewarding experience. All that is required is attendance at an interesting 2- to 3-hour training session offered by your local NWS office. The training courses are offered most often in the spring and fall of each year and are held throughout the New York State. Upcoming SKYWARN sessions are announced in a variety of ways including NOAA Weather Radio, Packet Radio, SKYWARN newsletters, and NWS homepages as well as through local media outlets.

    SKYWARN spotter networks are usually activated whenever there is a threat of severe weather, which is usually preceded by the issuance of a Severe Thunderstorm Watch, Tornado Watch, Flood Watch or some other type of watch. SKYWARN spotter reports can be relayed from whatever your location may be – your home, office, on the road or in your neighborhood. Information is relayed to the NWS via Amateur Radio, Packet Radio, Telephone (800#s) or the Internet.

    For more information on the SKYWARN program in your area, visit the website of the NWS office serving your county at the links listed below:

    Information above from the NYS Emergency Management Web Site

     

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